Seabird interns hard at work

This summer, we have two outstanding interns monitoring the gulls of Appledore, recording data, assisting with banding and blood draws, collecting prey remains, and, on top of it all, conducting their own independent projects. It’s time you met them.

FB_IMG_1498587477709Amisha Malhotra graduated this May with her Bachelor’s degree in Animal Behavior from the University of New England in Biddeford, Maine. She came to us with stellar recommendations from her UNE professors, and she has lived up to the praise. Amisha is hardworking, detail oriented, and a self-starter not intimidated by learning new skills. Within days of arriving on the island, she had decided to do her independent project on mate fidelity and divorce in Great Black-backed Gulls. She dove into the database, and has been teaching herself R, a data analysis program used commonly by biologists and other scientists. Amisha plans on going on to grad school of some stripe, and we have every confidence that she will be immensely successful.

 

 

 

 

20170619_142218David Mesta finished up his Associate’s degree in Laboratory Science at Northern Essex Community College this May. He joined us for a week of gull banding last year, and after that introduction, it was abundantly clear to me that David had what it took to spend a summer on the island doing field research. David is a keen observer, quietly taking everything in. Countless times, I would realize I needed a particular tool and look up to find David silently handing it to me, like a practiced surgeon’s assistant. David wants to continue his education by transferring to a 4 year institution to work on his Bachelor’s degree. His interests lie in the microbiology field, and his summer project on Appledore is focused on blood parasitism in Great Black-backed Gull chicks. We will be making blood smears on hundreds of fledglings during chick banding week this month, and spending our evenings hunched over microscopes scanning for the telltale signs of invaders infecting the gulls’ red blood cells. We can’t wait to see where David goes from here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s